Are you Sure you are Having Migraines? Awesome Summary

The below list is not my creation but I found it posted in one of the many migraine groups on Facebook as a pdf. This is a collection of all possible migraine types and headache types, all possible symptoms and prodrome types as well. I found it extremely helpful and perhaps you will too. Perhaps you should print this list, circle your symptoms, and show your doctor. I was not able to upload the pdf here only copy-pasted the contents. It was originally compiled by Kristina Heller Richard and Tracy Pidd Smith

1. Migraine
1.1 Migraines Without Aura (MWOA)
1.2 Migraine with Aura (MWA)
• Typical aura with migraine headache
• Typical aura with non-migraine headache
• Typical aura without headache “Acephalgic Migraine”
• Familial Hemiplegic migraine (FHM)
• Sporadic Hemiplegic migraine(SHM)
• Basilar-type migraine(BTM)
1.3 Childhood periodic syndromes that are commonly precursors of migraine
• Cyclical vomiting
• Abdominal migraine
• Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood
1.4 Retinal migraine
1.5 Complications of migraine
• Chronic migraine
• Status migrainous
• Persistent aura without infarction
• Migrainous infarction
• Migraine-triggered seizures
1.6 Probable migraine
• Probable Migraine w/o aura
• Probable Migraine w/ aura
• Probable Chronic Migraine
2. Tension-type headache ~
2.1 Infrequent episodic tension-type headache
• Infrequent episodic tension-type headache associated with pericranial tenderness
• Infrequent episodic tension-type headache not associated with pericranial tenderness
2.2 Frequent episodic tension-type headache
• Frequent episodic tension-type headache associated with pericranial tenderness
• Frequent episodic tension-type headache not associated with pericranial tenderness
2.3 Chronic tension-type headache
• Chronic tension-type headache associated with pericranial tenderness
• Chronic tension-type headache not associated with pericranial tenderness
2.4 Probable tension-type headache
• Probable infrequent episodic tension-type headache
• Probable frequent episodic tension-type headache
• Cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, Probable chronic tension-type
headache
3. Cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias
3.1 Cluster headache
• Episodic cluster headache
• Chronic cluster headache
3.2 Paroxysmal hemicrania
• Episodic paroxysmal hemicrania
• Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH)
3.3 Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing
(SUNCT)
3.4 Probable trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia
• Probable cluster headache
• Probable paroxysmal hemicrania
• Probable SUNCT
4. Other primary headaches
4.1 Primary stabbing headache
4.2 Primary cough headache
4.3 Primary exertional headache
4.4 Primary headache associated with sexual activity
• Pre-orgasmic headache
• Orgasmic headache
4.5 Hypnic headache
4.6 Primary thunderclap headache
4.7 Hemicrania continua
4.8 New daily-persistent headache (NDPH)
5. Headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma
5.1 Acute post-traumatic headache
• Acute post-traumatic headache attributed to moderate or severe head injury
• Acute post-traumatic headache attributed to mild head injury
5.2 Chronic post-traumatic headache
• Chronic post-traumatic headache attributed to moderate or severe head injury
• Chronic post-traumatic headache attributed to mild head injury
5.3 Acute headache attributed to whiplash injury
5.4 Chronic headache attributed to whiplash injury
5.5 Headache attributed to traumatic intracranial haematoma
• Chronic post-traumatic headache attributed to moderate or severe head injury
• Chronic post-traumatic headache attributed to mild head injury
5.6 Headache attributed to other head and/or neck
• Acute headache attributed to other head and/or neck trauma
• Chronic headache attributed to other head and/or neck trauma
5.7 Post-craniotomy headache
• Acute post-craniotomy headache
• Chronic post-craniotomy headache
6. Headache attributed to cranial or cervical vascular disorder
6.1 Headache attributed to ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack
• Headache attributed to ischemic stroke (cerebral infarction)
• Headache attributed to transient ischemic attack (TIA)
6.2 Headache attributed to non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage
• Headache attributed to intracerebral hemorrhage
• Headache attributed to subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH)
6.3 Headache attributed to unruptured vascular malformation
• Headache attributed to saccular aneurysm
• Headache attributed to arteriovenous malformation (AVM)
• Headache attributed to dural arteriovenous fistula
• Headache attributed to cavernous angioma
• Headache attributed to encephalotrigeminal or leptomeningeal angiomatosis (Sturge Weber
syndrome
6.4 Headache attributed to arteritis
• Headache attributed to giant cell arteritis (GCA)
• Headache attributed to primary central nervous system (CNS) angiitis
• Headache attributed to secondary central nervous system (CNS) angiitis
6.5 Carotid or vertebral artery pain
• Headache or facial or neck pain attributed to arterial dissection
• Post-endarterectomy headache
• Carotid angioplasty headache
• Headache attributed to intracranial endovascular procedures
• Angiography headache
6.6 Headache attributed to cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT)
6.7 Headache attributed to other intracranial vascular disorder
• Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy
(CADASIL)
• Mitochondrial Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS)
• Headache attributed to benign angiopathy of the central nervous system
• Headache attributed to pituitary apoplexy
7. Headache attributed to non-vascular intracranial disorder
7.1 Headache attributed to high cerebrospinal fluid pressure
• Headache attributed to idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH)
• Headache attributed to intracranial hypertension secondary to hydrocephalus
7.2 Headache attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure
• Post-dural puncture headache
• CSF fistula headache
• Headache attributed to spontaneous (or idiopathic) low CSF pressure
7.3 Headache attributed to non-infectious inflammatory disease
• Headache attributed to neurosarcoidosis
• Headache attributed to aseptic (non-infectious) meningitis
• Headache attributed to other non-infectious inflammatory disease
• Headache attributed to lymphocytic hypophysitis
7.4 Headache attributed to intracranial neoplasm
• Headache attributed to increased intracranial pressure or hydrocephalus caused by neoplasm
• Headache attributed directly to neoplasm
• Headache attributed to carcinomatous meningitis
• Headache attributed to hypothalamic or pituitary hyper- or hyposecretion
7.5 Headache attributed to intrathecal injection
7.6 Headache attributed to epileptic seizure
• Hemicrania epileptica
• Post-seizure headache
7.7 Headache attributed to Chiari malformation type I
7.8 Syndrome of transient Headache and Neurological Deficits with cerebrospinal fluid Lymphocytosis
(HaNDL)
7.9 Headache attributed to other non-vascular intracranial disorder
8. Headache attributed to a substance or its withdrawal
8.1 Headache induced by acute substance use or exposure
• Nitric oxide (NO) donor-induced headache
• Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor-induced headache
• Carbon monoxide-induced headache
• Alcohol-induced headache
• Immediate alcohol-induced headache
• Delayed alcohol-induced headache
• Headache induced by food components and additives
• Monosodium glutamate-induced headache
• Cocaine-induced headache
• Cannabis-induced headache
• Histamine-induced headache
• Immediate histamine-induced headache
• Delayed histamine-induced headache
• Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-induced headache
• Immediate CGRP-induced headache
• Delayed CGRP-induced headache
• Headache as an acute adverse event attributed to medication used for other indications
• Headache attributed to other acute substance use or exposure
8.2 Medication-overuse headache (MOH)
• Ergotamine-overuse headache
• Triptan-overuse headache
• Analgesic-overuse headache
• Opioid-overuse headache
• Combination analgesic-overuse headache
• Medication-overuse headache attributed to combination of acute medications
• Headache attributed to other medication overuse
8.3 Headache as an adverse event attributed to chronic medication
• Exogenous hormone-induced headache
8.4 Headache attributed to substance withdrawal
• Caffeine-withdrawal headache
• Opioid-withdrawal headache
• estrogen-withdrawal headache
• Headache attributed to withdrawal from chronic use of other substances
9 Headache attributed to infection
9.1 Headache attributed to intracranial infection
• Headache attributed to bacterial meningitis
• Headache attributed to lymphocytic menin
• Headache attributed to encephalitis
• Headache attributed to brain abscess
• Headache attributed to subdural empyema
9.2 Headache attributed to systemic infection
• Headache attributed to systemic bacterial infection
• Headache attributed to systemic viral infection
• Headache attributed to other systemic infection
9.3 Headache attributed to HIV/AIDS
9.4 Chronic post-infection headache
• Chronic post-bacterial meningitis headache
10. Headache attributed to disorder of homoeostasis
10.1 Headache attributed to hypoxia and/or hypercapnia
• High-altitude headache
• Diving headache
• Sleep apnea headache
10.2 Dialysis headache
10.3 Headache attributed to arterial hypertension
• Headache attributed to phaeochromocytoma
• Headache attributed to hypertensive crisis without hypertensive encephalopathy
• Headache attributed to hypertensive encephalopathy
• Headache attributed to pre-eclampsia
• Headache attributed to eclampsia
• Headache attributed to acute pressor response to an exogenous agent
10.4 Headache attributed to hypothyroidism
10.5 Headache attributed to fasting
10.6 Cardiac cephalalgia
10.7 Headache attributed to other disorder of homoeostasis
11. Headache or facial pain attributed to disorder of cranium, neck, eyes, ears, nose, sinuses,
teeth, mouth or other facial or cranial structures
11.1 Headache attributed to disorder of cranial bone
11.2 Headache attributed to disorder of neck
• Cervicogenic headache
• Headache attributed to retropharyngeal tendonitis
• Headache attributed to craniocervical dystonia
11.3 Headache attributed to disorder of eyes
• Headache attributed to acute glaucoma
• Headache attributed to refractive errors
• Headache attributed to heterophoria or heterotropia
• Headache attributed to ocular inflammatory disorder
11.4 Headache attributed to ocular inflammatory disorder
11.5 Headache attributed to rhinosinusitis
11.6 Headache attributed to disorder of teeth, jaws or related structures
11.7 Headache or facial pain attributed to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder
11.8 Headache attributed to other disorder of cranium, neck, eyes, ears, nose, sinuses, teeth,
mouth or other facial or cervical structures
12. Headache attributed to psychiatric disorder
12.1 Headache attributed to somatisation disorder
13. Cranial neuralgias and central causes of facial pain
13.1 Trigeminal neuralgia
• Classical Trigeminal neuralgia
• SymptomaticTrigeminal neuralgia
13.2 Glossopharyngeal neuralgia
13.3 Nervus intermedius neuralgia
13.4 Superior laryngeal neuralgia
13.5 Nasociliary neuralgia
13.6 Supraorbital neuralgia
13.7 Other terminal branch neuralgias
13.8 Occipital neuralgia
13.9 Neck-tongue syndrome
13.10 External compression headache
13.11 Cold-stimulus headache
• Headache attributed to external application of a cold stimulus
• Headache attributed to ingestion or inhalation of a cold stimulus
13.12 Constant pain caused by compression, irritation or distortion of cranial nerves or upper cervical
roots by structural lesions
13.13 Optic neuritis
13.14 Ocular diabetic neuropathy
13.15 Head or facial pain attributed to herpes zoster
• Head or facial pain attributed to acute herpes zoster
• Post-herpetic neuralgia
13.16 Tolosa-Hunt syndrome
13.17 Ophthalmoplegic “migraine”
13.18 Central causes of facial pain
• Anaesthesia dolorosa
• Central post-stroke pain
• Facial pain attributed to multiple sclerosis
• Persistent idiopathic facial pain
• Burning mouth syndrome
13.19 Other cranial neuralgia or other centrally mediated facial pain
*http://ihs-classification.org/en/
5*SOME OF THE SYMPTOMS MAY BE SEEN IN ONE OR ALL THE STAGES DEPENDING
ON THE MIGRAINE/HEADACHE.*
STAGE 1 Prodromal Some people experience these changes several hours or days before an attack
symptoms which may include but not limited to:
• Change in mood(dissociated, depressed, irritable)
• Changes in elimination
• Chills
• Cold skin
• Cravings (sweet/salty, hot/spicy,etc.)
• Detached or Dissociated
• Dizziness
• Energy levels(low, high, euphoria)
• Fatigue, sleepy
• Feeling distant
• Graying or blacking of vision
• Light headed
• Metallic/blood taste
• Muffled hearing
• Nausea
• Nose bleed
• Pallor
• Palpitation
• Severe congestion
• Sleep (light, heat, fragmented, night mares, paralysis)
• Stiff Neck
• Sweating
• Vertigo
• Yawning
STAGE 2 Aura stage.. (This stage may or may not manifest) and symptoms which may include
but not limited to:
• Anxiety (Difficulty breathing in, chest pain,etc)
• Ataxia
• Bloodshot eye
• Body temperature rising
• BP drops
• BP spikes
• Dysarthria
• Feeling of carotid artery pounding out of neck
• Hypacusia
• Impending doom during the aura phase and go into the fight or flight response
• Lump in the throat (glotus sensation)
• Migraine syncope (BTM)
• Muscle tone is flaccid
• Panic attack
• Pressure on brain stem
• Pressure on the bridge of nose
• Runny nose
• Side draws or feels like it is drawing up
• Skin turning red
• Sound of blood rushing in ear
• Temples feel tight
• Throw up
• True vertigo
• Uncontrollable shaking
Auditory symptoms (which may include but not limited to:)
• buzzing
• decreased hearing
• hallucinations
• loss of hearing
• ringing
• roaring
Tingling symptoms (which may include but not limited to:)
• above the eye
• arm
• below the eye
• breast
• buttock
• calf
• cheek
• nose
• chest
• down into the jaw
• eyelid
• feet
• finger
• forearm
• forehead
• hands
• hip
• leg
• lower back
• mouth
• neck
• roof of mouth
• scalp
• side of face
• spine
• teeth / gums
• thigh
• throat
• toes
• tongue
• torso
• upper back
• wrist
Numbness (which may include but not limited to:)
• above the eye
• arms
• below the eye
• breast
• bridge of the nose
• buttock
• calf
• cheek
• chest
• down into the jaw
• eyelid
• feet
• forearm
• forehead
• hands
• head
• hip
• leg
• lower back
• mouth
• neck
• roof of mouth
• scalp
• side of face
• spine
• teeth/gums
• thigh
• throat
• tongue
• torso
• upper back
• wrist
Phantosmia/ Olfactory (which may include but not limited to:)
• chilli
• coffee
• musty
• rubbing alcohol
• smoke
• sour
• sweet
• oversensitive to others
Speech symptoms (which may include but not limited to:)
• can’t find the words
• can’t get the words out
• Dysphasia – inability to speak
• impaired / slurred
• words jumbled
Stroke like symptoms which may include but not limited to:
• Coma
• Disturbances of consciousness
• Drooling
• Drooping
• Fainting
• Fever
• Memory loss
• Motor Weakness*(Hemiplegic Migraine)
• Odd sensations like insects or water over the scalp
• Paralysis such as: monoplegia, diplegia, hemiplegia parenthesis
• Twitching
Aphasia (which may include but not limited to:)
• Inability to comprehend or retain what is read
• Not comprehend other people’s conversation
• Speak in sentences that don’t make sense
• Speak in short or incomplete sentences
• Speak unrecognizable words
• Write sentences that don’t make sense
Brain Fog (which may include but not limited to:)
• Confusion
• Impaired reasoning
• Repetitions while speaking
• Short term memory loss
• Unable to concentrate
Alice in Wonderland Symptoms (which may include but not limited to:)
• Altered body image
• Head feels heavy
• Head feels large
• Head feels light
• Head feels small
• Limbs perceive to be missing or parts of them
• Noise is hollow
• Paranoia
• Things look elongated/shorter then they actually are
• Time speeds up
• Time slows down
Vision symptoms (which may include but not limited to:)
• black
• blurred
• bright
• spots
• clouded
• dark
• dazzling
• zigzag
• lights
• eye pain
• flashes of light
• flashing
• floaters – various shapes
• impaired
• partial loss of sight
• scotoma
• snowy
• spotty
• total sight loss
• tunnel
• wavy lines
• whitening
• Visual vertigo feel imbalanced
• veers to side when walking
• visual stimuli – patterned carpets, stripes, escalators, words on newspapers, etc
STAGE 3 Headache stage..this is the pain stage which sometimes is absent. Pain can be anywhere
and may start or travel anywhere and may include but not limited to:
• abdomen
• above the eye
• arm
• behind the eye
• below the eye
• buttocks
• calf
• cheek
• ear
• electric shock feelings
• eyelid
• face
• feet
• fingers
• forearm
• forehead
• hand
• head
• hip
• jaw
• lower back
• mouth
• nasal
• neck
• night-time pain spike
• scalp
• sinus
• spine
• stabbing flank pain
• teeth / gums
• thigh
• throat
• tongue
• torso
• upper back
• wrist
Headache/migraine (which may include but not limited to:)
• bilateral
• dull ache and get worse
• electric shock feelings
• like a spike being driven in mead
• pain spikes on one side
• pain switch sides
• pounding headache
• prominent blood vessels in temple
• pulsing, headache right side
• stabbing flank pain
• throbbing
• unilateral
STAGE 4 Resolution stage (which may include but not limited to:)
• fatigue
• pale skin
• pain stops
• pain slows down
• vomiting
STAGE 5 Postdromal or recovery phase (which may include but not limited to:)
• Depression or malaise
• Exhausted
• Facial pulling
• Fatigue and/or sleepiness
• Less severe head pain
• Muscle weakness
• Scalp tender
Restless (which may include but not limited to:)
• Arm
• Back
• Head
• Leg
• Knee
• Torso
• Pelvic
Involuntary twitching (which may include but not limited to:)
• arm
• back
• breast
• calf
• cheek
• chest
• eyebrow
• eyelids
• feet
• hands
• head
• jaw
• knee
• leg
• lips
• mouth
• neck
• shoulder
• thigh
• tongue
• torso
• wrist
Muscle pain(which may include but not limited to: abdomen
• arms
• back
• calf
• cheek
• chest
• feet
• fingers
• forearm
• hand
• head
• jaw
• leg
• lower back
• neck
• penis
• shoulders
• stomach
• thigh
• throat
• toes
• tongue
• upper back
• vagina
• wrist
• hyper/hypo-sensitivity to feel and touch
Tenderness(which may include but not limited to:)
• in abdomen
• in arms
• in back
• in calf
• in cheek
• in chest
• in feet
• in fingers
• in forearm
• in hand
• in head
• n jaw
• in leg
• in lower back
• in neck
• in penis
• in shoulders
• in stomach
• in thigh
• in throat
• in toes
• in tongue
• in upper back
• n vagina
• in wrist
Heath problems Migraineurs have in common (which may include but not limited
to:)
• Agoraphobia
• Alcoholism
• Allergies
• Allodynia
• Alzheimer
• Anemia
• Angioedermas
• Anxiety
• Asthma
• Autoimmune diseases
• Barrett’s esophagus
• Bruxism
• Cancer
• Celiac Diseases
• Cervical Spondylosis
• Chronic Ear Infections,etc,
• Chronic Epstein-Barr’s
• Chronic fatigue syndrome
• Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD)
• Crohn’s
• Conversation Disorder
• Dementia
• Depression
• Diverticulitis
• Drug Addiction
• Dysautonomia Ehlder’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS)
• Dystonia
• Endometriosis
• Epilepsy’s
• Essential tremor
• Fibromyalgia
• Gastroesosphageal reflux disease (GERD)
• Gluten Intolerence
• Hashimotos Disease
• Hiatal Hernia
• High cholesterol
• Hypertension
• Hypotension
• Hypothyroidism
• Immune Deficiencies
• Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
• Lupus
• Lyme
• Mast Cell Disorders
• Meniere’s disease
• Mental Illness
• Multiple sclerosis(MS)
• Muscular Dystropy (MD)
• Obesity
• Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
• Osteoarthritis
• Panic disorder
• Parathyroidism
• Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO)
• Peripheral neuropathy
• Plantar fasciitis with bone spurs
• Plantar fascoitis without bone spurs
• Polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS)
• Postnatal depression POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome)
• Raynaud’s disease
• Radiculopathy
• Reversible Ischemic Neurological Deficit (RIND)
• RLS – Restless Leg Syndrome
• Rosacea
• Obesity
• Seizures
• Sinusitis
• Sjogren’s syndrome
• Stroke
• Suicide
• Temporomandibular disorder ( TMJD)
• Transient Ischemic Attack(TIA)
• Tricuspid Regurgitation – leaky tricuspid valve
• Various heart problem
• Vasovagal syncope
• Visual Snow (VS)

About Angela A Stanton, Ph.D.

Angela A Stanton, PhD, is a Neuroeconomist focusing on chronic pain, electrolyte homeostasis, and genetics. She lives in Southern California. Her current research is focused on migraine cause, prevention and treatment without the use of medicines. As a forever migraineur from childhood, her discovery was helped by experimenting on herself. She found the cause of migraine to be at the ionic level, associated with disruption of the electrolyte homeostasis, resulting from genetic variations of all voltage gated channels that modulate electrolytes and voltage in the brain, insulin and glucose transporters, and several other related variants, such as the MTHFR variants of the B vitamin methylation process and many others. Migraineurs are glucose sensitive and should avoid eating carbs as much as possible. As a result of the success of the first edition of her book and new research and findings after treating over 4000 migraineurs world wide, all ages and both genders, she is now finishing the 2nd edition. The 2nd edition is the “holy grail” of migraines, incorporating all there is to know and also hypotheses. It includes an academic research section with suggestions for further research. The book is full of citations to authenticate the statements she makes to be followed up by those interested and to spark further research interest. It is a "Complete Guide". Due out in the summer of 2017. Dr. Stanton received her BSc at UCLA in Mathematics, MBA at UCR, MS in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University, PhD in NeuroEconomics at Claremont Graduate University, and fMRI certification at Harvard University Medical School at the Martinos Center for Neuroimaging for experimenting with neurotransmitters on human volunteers. For relaxation Dr. Stanton paints and photographs. Follow her on Twitter at: @MigraineBook
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2 Responses to Are you Sure you are Having Migraines? Awesome Summary

  1. happyface313 says:

    Wow, what a list – thank you 🙂 !
    I will definitely be able to circle a few of the symptoms listed! 🙂

    Like

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