An Image that Says it All

anti-veganism in India

anti-veganism in India

About Angela A Stanton, Ph.D.

Angela A Stanton, PhD, is a Neuroeconomist focusing on chronic pain--migraine in particular--physiology, electrolyte homeostasis, nutrition, and genetics. She lives in Southern California. Her current research is focused on migraine cause, prevention and treatment without the use of medicine. As a forever migraineur from childhood, her discovery was helped by experimenting on herself. She found the cause of migraine to be at the ionic level, associated with disruption of the electrolyte homeostasis, resulting from genetic variations of all voltage dependent channels, gates, and pumps that modulate electrolyte mineral density and voltage in the brain. In addition, insulin and glucose transporters, and several other variants, such as MTHFR variants of B vitamin methylation process and many others that are different in the case of a migraineur from the general population. Migraineurs are glucose sensitive (carbohydrate intolerant) and should avoid eating carbs as much as possible. She is working on her hypothesis that migraine is a metabolic disease. As a result of the success of the first edition of her book and her helping over 4000 migraineurs successfully prevent their migraines world wide, all ages and both genders, and all types of migraines, she published the 2nd (extended) edition of her migraine book "Fighting The Migraine Epidemic: Complete Guide: How To Treat & Prevent Migraines Without Medications". The 2nd edition is the “holy grail” of migraine cause, development, and prevention, incorporating all there is to know. It includes a long section with for medical and research professionals. The book is full of academic citations (over 800) to authenticate the statements she makes to be followed up by those interested and to spark further research interest. It is a "Complete Guide", published on September 29, 2017. Dr. Stanton received her BSc at UCLA in Mathematics, MBA at UCR, MS in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University, PhD in NeuroEconomics at Claremont Graduate University, fMRI certification at Harvard University Medical School at the Martinos Center for Neuroimaging for experimenting with neurotransmitters on human volunteers, certification in LCHF/ketogenic diet from NN (Nutrition Network), currently working on her certification in physiology, and functional medicine. Dr. Stanton is an avid sports fan, currently power weight lifting and kickboxing. For relaxation (yeah.. about a half minute each day), she paints and photographs and loves to spend time with her family of husband of 44 years, 2 sons and their wives, and 2 granddaughters. Follow her on Twitter at: @MigraineBook, LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/angelaastantonphd/ and facebook at https://www.facebook.com/DrAngelaAStanton/
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15 Responses to An Image that Says it All

  1. chris c says:

    Ironic that vegans attack vegetarians. But not surprising, they are not rational.

    Disclaimer: I have vegetarians and a vegan in my family, I ddon’t care what they eat and they don’t care what I eat. I also know a couple of ow carb vegans but they are fat and don’t look healthy – I don’t know if this was before or after their conversion though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is backwards: vegetarians are attacking vegans. They don’t want vegans to come into India. In India vegetarians eat dairy, eat eggs, drink milk. They are way better off then vegans. Since the vegan movement entered India, people’s health has fallen.

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      • chris c says:

        I have more than a little suspicion that the massive increase in diabetes in India results from the replacement of their healthy butter, ghee and coconut oil with Omega 6 seed oils. That seems to be one of the biggest dietary changes everywhere.

        The estimable Michael Eades has a talk which covers a lot of the highly technical stuff Peter at Hyperlipid dug up abut their effects on mitochondria

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        • chris c says:

          That’s Michael Eades and about obviously. Why do you only spot the typos after you have hit publish???

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        • Because you are my e-friend and it is contagious?? Because I have yet to finish a sentence without having to go back and edit it 5 times. 😉 I changed it for ya

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        • I agree though they are also not immune from sugar. The sugar consumption in that part of the world is amazing! Not sure about India but my hubby went to Japan last year and sent a face-time show to me about a HUGE line-up in a mall… so I asked what the people were lining up for and then he turned the camera to the store: a candy store. They let 3 people in at the time and people were coming out with huge bags of candy. My hubby’s next question was: so since they eat so much candy and every single sauce everywhere is sweetened, how come the Japanese are so thin? And here we come to the TOFI people. The Japanese and others–probably Indian as well–have the kind of adipocytes that are limited in numbers and can swell only to be so big. So they look thin but are, in fact, very fat around their organs.

          So I think what is happening in India–as well as other East Asian countries–is that people have a thin body composition with the kind of adipocytes that make it impossible to “spot” those with T2D. So we may have been under the impression that T2D in those countries is low because no one measured it right–no one thought of measuring diabetes in the thin people–just like they don’t think of it anywhere else. I think that T2D is a way bigger problem than we think only a good portion of the sick are not aware.

          So while vegetable oils most certainly are harmful, their connection to T2D is unknown at this point. I see it rather as a processed carbs and sugar problem.

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        • chris c says:

          Oh true, but things have gotten worse recently. I wonder if yet another factor is the increase in modern wheat which differs significantly from its predecessor. A few years back the farmers I know were getting £30 – £50 per toone LESS than the cost of production for their wheat. The following year the price had gone back up and I was told this was because of increased sales to China. According to T Colon Campbell this will improve their health. According to his data (as per Denise Minger among others) it will make it worse. Still waiting to see what happens.

          Yes Indians are also very fond of their sweets, like jaggery. But then they always were, it would be interesting to see versions of NHANES for various countries to see exactly what has changed and over what timescales.

          I suspect some complexity, like an excess of Omega 6 induces insulin resistance, which breaks carbohydrate metabolism, and the hyperinsulinemia goes on to break fat metabolism, which makes the excess O6 and lack of O3 worse, etc. Backing away from processed foods and dietician’s recommendations seems to work. Earlier I had a slice of roasted pheasant breast on a thickly buttered oatcake and shortly I will have my main meal – lamb’s liver and bacon with a giant mushroom fried in EVOO and some Brussels sprouts. My Gran would have approved, and she lived to be 90. So would many of my neighbours, one was 108.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I had to look up EVOO as I had no clue what it was. I wonder why you eat that instead of butter? Butter has a lot of O3 in it and also MCT whereas EVOO doesn’t and 25% of the fat in butter is monounsaturated. It also has a ton of short chain fatty acids–highly desired. Here is the link to the USDA full report on butter
          Scroll down to see the individual fatty and amino acids.

          There is much more PUFA in olive oil and zero amino acids–and wow it has more cholesterol than butter? See the link here

          I was trying to create an image of the comparison chart… instead, here is the link to the article I wrote on that in the quick.

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        • chris c says:

          I eat it as well as butter. Next question . . . I like the different flavours in different contexts, it gives an edge to the liver and mushroom.

          I also like cheese, currently I have a seasonal one called Vacherin Mont d’Or which is like Brie with a turbocharger, and shortly I think I will fry some Halloumi (in olive oil!) I also like some local ones, it’s something of a regional speciality in the UK. Loads of healthy fats and fat-soluble nutrients and most of them taste good too.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I never heard of any of those… sound yummy

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        • chris c says:

          When I lived in Somerset, we used to get genuine farmhouse cheddar from farms not a million miles from Cheddar village, that was a treat. One of my local favourites – from Norfolk – is Wells Alpine, then there’s Red Leicester, Wensleydale etc. amd my all time favourite Orkney Smoked which you could only get up North. Then the internet was invented and it can arrive on my doorstep.

          I feel sorry for you guys with Kraft . . .

          Liked by 1 person

        • 🙂 No Kraft here… I mean they are in general sores but who goes to general stores?? There are cheeses from all over the world in most better stores. They are like cheese stands–in some stores several of them–with 50-100 different cheese types. I prefer the creamy soft cheeses like triple cream Brie or similar. The hardest cheese I ever eat is mozzarella. Hubby loves the hard cheeses. There are a lot of rally good hard cheeses from Spain and Mexico. My favorite treat every day is string cheese…. I literally pull the strings to eat it. It may drive people nuts watching me eat it but it is so good! 😀

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        • chris c says:

          Good to know!

          https://www.cheese.com

          keep you entertained for hours

          Some time ago there was a thing about Unilever on the news. I told my (vegetarian) cousin I didn’t have any of their products in my house and he didn’t believe me. I checked and it was true. In fact I hardly have any products from any of the “food” manufacturers. That helps.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I don;t have anything that comes in any package other than salt and sardines, and dairy of course. For my very “unhealthy” diet I just got an A+++ for the DXA scan for my bones. At my age, it is mandatory to go for one. I don;t know a single other woman my age whose bones don;t need some help… I think I may just be making the Guinness Book of World Records (in the USA) for not needing to take any calcium. 😉 I know.. milk is bad for me… 😉 and I need to eat more fiber (I now eat 0)

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        • chris c says:

          That’s the way to do it!

          Liked by 1 person

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